Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121222
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unparalleled experience. as president kennedy said to david herbert donald one day, the great historian, donald comes in, there's been one of those rankings of presidents come out. kennedy didn't like it, and he said no one -- he pointed at his desk -- he said no one has a right to judge nip, even poor james buchanan who hasn't sat at that desk and seen what he's seen and dealt with what he's dealt with. [laughter] so, and i think there's a lot to that. on the louisiana purchase, the louisiana purchase led to the first really sustained secession thinking and movement in american history which was new england, because new england saw the
with muslims. we talk a lot about my friend, reverend bob roberts, a southern baptist preacher who during the ground zero time, they win on went out on a limb with how supportive they were. bob roberts in deep red texas started reading matt 10 things i love about muslims. ten things i admire about islam. and i thought, why are you doing this? and he said, i am a christian, as is what i have to do. you people are in trouble, and i have to stand up for you. so i find that wonderful and he built a civic bridge with me, based on the inspiration of this tradition. that kind of stuff is going on a little bit below the radar screen. a little bit behind the scenes in both campaigns. i think it is a broadly positive thing for america. >> what you think is the biggest roadblock that your organization or interface groups are facing today? what do you think are one or two things that people can help about with relieving those were boxed. >> that's a great question, thank you for that. her questions i always ask my friend antiperspirant one of you take this one first, a quick answer. >> deepest fear t
at it and speaking of coming back at it, we have a second bite of the apple for bob. >> we are familiar with statistics that the u.s. spends significantly more percentage of gnp on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. what i was surprised to hear at a recent conference was exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups for seniors and people with disabilities or things like this. which raises the question in my mind would it be better for us to rebalance our spending in this direction to provide better quality by providing support services that allow people to stay in their homes functioning well instead of institutionalizing them which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens because it makes no sense. we know it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much kind of support structure is a very large one. i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized in long-term ca
of the success of an nato enforced u.s.-backed no-fly zone in libya , like to ask you this same question that bob asked the two kendis last night which was, it sort of struck by most people. what about a no-fly zone in syria? and there are military differences. russian imported anti aircraft sophisticated things, but the answer that both romney and obama gave was no. no military involvement. the no-fly zone is a stab toward military involvement, but not a full military environment. what would be your answer to a question? >> frankly, this is part -- some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was that if we intervene in the rea to libya they're already done this. it makes things -- that's a little bit too flippant. personally if i were in that position i would be in favor of a no-fly zone. i think so with the turks. look, you're doing the same thing. you are repeating history over and over again. and what i think is problematic is sending a certain caliber weapons top position which we don't know exactly who they are. that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want thos
counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to come about to write this book. >> good afternoon. i would like to thank the committee on law and national security for giving me the opportunity to work on this book project. if he told a couple of years ago , i was still at college that soon thereafter are be working gun national security policy book, would have told you were crazy. i have been to a number of committee events in the past and i often hear panelists described that only now we seem national-security will really come into its own separate field and seeing enterprises like welfare in national security loan center will reviews and journals popple ball
-- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament members who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacceptable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aggravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-olds receive minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyone over 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to be less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cut
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)